A California GPS technology company said it’s planning on building a big addition to its existing Westminster facility.

Trimble Inc. said it’s planning on building a second building in Westminster that can house up to 1,100 new workers and be its largest employment facility.
A California GPS technology company said it’s planning on building a big addition to its existing Westminster facility.
Trimble Inc. (Nasdaq: TRMB), which is based in Sunnyvale, Calif., said it’s planning on building a second building in Westminster that can house up to 1,100 new workers and be its largest employment facility.
The new addition will be located next to Trimble’s current 125,000-square-foot facility at 10368 Westmoor Drive, which was completed four years ago. The new building will be “nearly the twin” of the company’s existing building, the company said.
“T he Westminster campus is at full capacity and beyond. After just four years of growth, the location has proven to be a key asset to the company due to its central location and its emphasis on collaborative workspaces,” the company said.
Company officials praised Colorado employees and the area’s quality of life.
“Colorado has proven to be a strategic element in our U.S. operations since we opened our initial Westminster office in 2000 and completed the first building project in 2013. The area attracts a desirable and growing pool of tech talent and provides an attractive quality of life to our employees,” said Steven Berglund, Trimble president and CEO, in a statement.
The general contractor on the project is JE Dunn, Denver-based OZ Architecture is the lead engineering firm, and the building’s expected to be completed in late 2018.

Ben Miller
Contributing Writer

Denver Business Jurnal

Hiring software engineers to work in Denver

Since Sept. 12, Apple the Cupertino, California-based tech giant has posted three software engineering jobs openings for a location in Denver.
The openings come after spring rumors Apple could lease significant space in downtown for a technology development office.
A job posting Monday tells prospective applicants in mapping data engineering that the position “is to join an exceptionally skilled group” working with data science, statistics, geospatial data and deep learning.
“Apple isn’t [the] only location company growing in Denver. Not surprised by this,” tweeted Brian McMahon on Tuesday. McMahon used to run Denver-based MapQuest, the Verizon-owned online mapping company that’s based in downtown.
Apple’s mapping technology hires in Denver would work two blocks from Mapquest.
Apple’s openings in Denver are the latest by some of the biggest tech employers to hire here.
Amazon Inc. held a job fair a year ago to hire people for a software engineering office it quietly opened in Broomfield. Farther west, Google started construction on a new Boulder campus with room to eventually triple the search giant’s presence there to 1,500 employees.
Redwood City, California-based Oracle has for years had its second-largest concentration of U.S. employees at its Broomfield campus, where about 2,000 people work.
Last week, GPS technology company Trimble Inc., based in Sunnyvale, California, said a new building under construction in Westminster would give it room to double its workforce there to 1,100 and make it the largest employment center the 9,000-employee company has worldwide.

By Greg Avery – Reporter, Denver Business Journal

Robotics industry growth to be gigantic in next five years

Jul 5, 2017, 7:15am MDT

Industries & Tags

Manufacturing

Growth in the global robotics market is expected to be massive in the next five years, according to Boulder market intelligence firm.

Revenue from sales of industrial and non-industrial robots is expected to rise from $31 billion in 2016 to $237.3 billion by 2022, according to Tractica research.

Most of the growth will come from the massive increase in sales of consumer robots, enterprise robots, autonomous vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (drones), which will overtake traditional industrial robots, according to Tractica.

“The key underlying story emerging in the industry is that industrial robotics, which has been the traditional pillar of the robotics market, has given way to non-industrial robot categories like personal assistant robots, UAVs, and autonomous vehicles,” said Aditya Kaul,Tractica research director, in a statement.

Locally, that growth in robots is evident with last month’s announcement that Misty Robotics was spun off from Sphero, the Boulder-based maker of the smartphone-controlled BB-8 robot, and has launched with an initial backing of $11.5 million.

And Amazon.com said it will staff its new Thornton fulfillment center with a fleet of robots, as well as human workers

 

Out of top 25 US cities for tech, where does Denver rank?

Ben Miller Contributing Writer

Out of the top 25 U.S. cities for technologies, Denver ranks in the top 10.

According to a new report by real estate services firm Cushman & Wakefield, Denver ranks eighth nationally when it comes “talent, capital and growth opportunity.” The company called the ingredients a “tech stew,” involving “local universities, capital, tech workers, knowledge workers, educated workers, and entrepreneurial spirit.”

According to Cushman & Wakefield’s “Tech Cities 1.0” report, San Jose-Silicon Valley is rated No. 1, followed by San Francisco, Washington, D.C., Boston, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Seattle and Austin, Texas.

While Denver is not the headquarters location for many big technology companies, we’ve continued to see larger, more established firms opening offices in Denver, including Google, Apple, and Amazon,” said Steve Billigimeier, executive managing director, Cushman & Wakefield in Denver, in a statement. He added “in addition to Colorado’s impressive list of colleges and universities, Denver continues to draw employees from across the country and finished first in Forbes’ 2015 and 2016 ‘Best Places for Business’ list.”

Last month, Colorado was ranked in the top tier of most innovative U.S. states in rankings compiled by the Consumer Technology Association.

And in October, Colorado was ranked second among U.S. states in turning technology and science capabilities into high-paying jobs.

Making Denver a friendly place for cyclists is a big issue for city leaders.

Kathleen Lavine | Denver Business Journal

At a city council meeting last March, Denver Council President Albus Brooks said that decreasing reliance on cars is “the area that most of us on City Council agree on — that this is the direction that we want to go.”

Some argue that putting so much effort into this is bad news for cars and will only increase congestion further. Others advocate for it as being a way to provide routes for all modes of transportation and promote exercise and better air quality. For now, it appears city officials are making progress on bikes. A pair of recent reports named the Mile High City among the best in the nation for being bike-friendly.

RewardExpert, an online travel service company, said Denver was the 10th most bike-friendly city for tourists.

The report ranked the U.S.’s 53 largest cities based on 13 metrics, such as biking infrastructure, city profile, bike-sharing availability and biking safety.

“Denver is historically a very bike-friendly city. It scored well across all our dimensions. The city has 267 miles of paved biking paths, which ranks third of all the cities we analyzed,” RewardExpert’s report said.

“Denver’s B-cycle has many stations and bikes in its fleet. Denver ranked fourth in regard to number of bike share stations per capita. Travelers should have no problem biking through the city.”

And late last month, WalkScore.com ranked Denver as the 4th most bike-friendly in the U.S.. Denver received a bike-score of 71, calculated by measuring bike infrastructure (lanes, trails, etc.), hills, destinations and road connectivity, and the number of bike commuters.

Denver also receives relatively high marks for its walkability, a long-time focus of state leaders. In the WalkScore report, it ranked 16th overall, and a recent Thrillist ranking put it 10th in the nation.

Adding to both Denver’s walkability and bicycle-friendliness is something Denver Parks and Recreation is tackling, too. The city will begin improvements to the Washington Park Loop Road with the of goal of making it safer for visitors.

The 2.2-mile road follows the perimeter of the park and is popular for cycling, walking, rollerblading and jogging. Modifications will include a new configuration aimed at addressing major congestion points along the loop

They include:

Lane configuration improvements comprised of a two-way pedestrian lane separated by a two-foot painted buffer from two unidirectional lanes that accommodate wheel-based recreation

Crosswalk and car traffic zone improvements with hatched buffers, flexible bollards, green dashed pavement markings, shared lane markings, pavement markings, and painted crosswalks.

Signage improvements and the addition of new lane configuration signs, speed limit signs and vehicular regulatory traffic signs. These signs will be installed in strategic areas throughout the park to ensure maximum opportunity for education and awareness of the rules and regulation along Loop Road and throughout Washington Park.

Construction on the Washington Park loop improvement project will begin June 19 and is slated for completion by the end of July.

 

Beyond spaghetti and meatballs: 11 must-visit Italian restaurants in Denver

There’s nothing quite like a plate of good old-fashioned spaghetti and meatballs, but these restaurants? They take that classic dish to the next level.

Zagat — a unit of Google parent Alphabet Inc. (Nasdaq: GOOG) — put together a list of 11 must-visit Italian restaurants in Denver, consisting mostly of spots that have just popped up in the last few years.

Spuntino. 2639 W. 32nd Ave. “All the warmth of a mom-and-pop trattoria, all the savvy of… more

From polenta-stuffed agnolotti dal plin with ‘nduja and shrimp, and pappardelle, to pizzas topped creamed leeks and fennel pollen, to bucatini all’Amatriciana, pollo alla diavola, tartufo, and much more.

Caitlin Hendee is digital producer and social engagement manager for the Denver Business Journal and covers education. Email: chendee@bizjournals.com. Phone

 

Sushi bowl spot doubles down in Glendale

Kailyn Lamb May 18, 2017

PokeCity’s second location will open soon in Glendale off of South Colorado Boulevard.

Jay Yoon is poking around new retail locations all over Denver as he expands his sushi bowl chain. Yoon opened the first PokeCity restaurant in October in the Denver Tech Center.

The restaurant offers Hawaiian-style bowls, filled with raw fish and rice with vegetables and sauce.

By January, he decided to expand, picking up a larger location in Glendale on South Colorado Boulevard and East Mississippi Avenue. He said that spot should open this month and is 2,000 square feet, which Yoon said will allow him to add more dining seating space, as well as take-out and delivery services.

“I’m trying to make the dining area bigger,” Yoon said. “Poke places in California are very small.”

Yoon is hoping the traffic on Colorado Boulevard will help to keep the restaurant busy. A third location at South Broadway and Englewood Parkway is also in the works. Yoon, who has been working with David Hicks and Lampert to find new spaces, said he wants to also add locations on the 16th Street Mall and in Westminster. But hiring staff has been a challenge, despite a social media push on Facebook and offering signing bonuses for employees who work with the restaurant for six months, Yoon said.

He’s up against a booming poke land grab by competing chains. Chicago-based Aloha Poke Co. announced this week that it’s coming to RiNo.

The first PokeCity restaurant opened in October in the Denver Tech Center.

Platte Street will get two new poke restaurants. Poke House will open on Platte and 17th Street this summer and Denver Poke Co. will open across the street at 1550 Plate St.

Yoon’s Broadway location won’t be open until June of next year, giving him time to find people. One way that he copes with hiring woes has been to bring in friends from California to help with management at PokeCity. His family members also work at the restaurant. Other locations will have to wait until he can find staff.“I know how to set up businesses easily and fast,” he said. “I think there’s a lot of opportunity in Denver, she’s growing.”

Yoon first moved to Colorado from Korea more than 25 years ago. He spent 10 years in Denver before moving to California. There, he spent more than 15 years working in the restaurant industry. Once he came back to the Denver, he decided to open a poke restaurant. While poke spots were popular in California, Colorado had yet to catch on, and Yoon saw an opportunity. Now that PokeCity has gotten off the ground, Yoon is hoping to start other restaurants as well. He’s looking into starting a Korean barbecue restaurant as well as another bowl themed restaurant with different

Millennials in Denver

Colorado Real Estate Journal – April 5, 2017

by John Rebchook

Millennials making it, mostly renting in Mile High City

Millennials. Every city wants them. Denver is actually getting them.

A fair share of the 10,000 or so people moving to the Mile High City every month are in the coveted demographic group. Many of these millennials are renters, good news for the Denver area multifamily market.

“Millennials are the biggest generation ever” and also are the most educated group ever, noted John Burns, CEO of John Burns Real Estate Consulting.

Burns, who is based in California, made those millennial comments earlier this year at a ULI Colorado event. But Burns said that the word “millennial” as a catchall definition for people born between 1984 and 2002 doesn’t make much sense.

“If you are talking to millennials born in the ’80s and those born in the 1990s, you will have a much different conversation,” Burns said.

He decided to dig deeper into the demographic trends.

After three years and 9,000 hours of research, his firm came up with eight different demographics to describe those born in decades from the 1930s to the 2000s. Burns and co-author Chris Porter summed up their findings in a book: “Big Shifts Ahead: Demographic Clarity for Business.”

“Denver looks a little different” than other parts of the country, Burns said.

“Denver is more skewed to those born in the ’80s and in the ’70s than anywhere else in the country,” he said.

Those born in the 1970s, he has dubbed as the “balancers,” and those born in the 1980s are the “sharers.” Those two millennial demographics account for 33.4 percent of the Denver area population, according to research by Burns.

The balancers, of course, want everything: balance between work, family and play.

The sharers are the earliest generation of millennials. They also like social media, such as Facebook, lnstagram and Snapchat. They also remember the hard economic lessons of the Great Recession.

“They learned their lessons from their parents and are afraid of debt,” Burns said.

That is, other than student debt, as they are saddled with much of the $1.2 trillion in debt in the U.S., he pointed out.

Denver, he said, has been a leader in master-planned communities that provide housing, retail and offices in places such as Stapleton, Lowry and Arvada.

“Give me urban with great schools and you can’t miss,” according to Burns.

These are what he calls “surbans,” communities with suburban and urban qualities.

“Give me cool urban in the suburbs. Love that urban feel. Surban sounds better than mixed-use,” Burns said.

Because Denver skews younger than much the U.S., that bodes well for the apartment market, according to Chris Porter, the chief demographer and researcher at Burns, who in addition to being the co-author of Big Shifts Ahead, is the chief demographer and researcher at Burns Real Estate Consulting.

“We know right now the younger population is delaying many of the big milestones in life, like buying a home, and not necessarily by choice,” Porter said.

“As a group, as they enter adulthood, they are tending to rent,” Porter added. “That should boost the apartment market, purely as a demographic shift.”

Indeed, a national report released last week by Florida International University and Florida Atlantic University said that Denver is one of only three cities in the nation where renting an apartment carries less risk than buying a home. The report, by Beracha, Hardin & Johnson, ranked Denver with Dallas and Houston because of rapidly rising home prices.

“It probably does make more sense to rent than to buy in Denver right now,” Porter agreed.

On the other hand, he is not down on the Denver housing market, either. In fact, it is somewhat of a Goldilocks market – not too hot and not too cold, according to Porter.

The younger population in Denver also is good news for restaurants, he noted.

“One thing we are noticing and something you will see across the country is that younger buyers are more cost-conscious,” Porter said.

“They don’t want to rely too heavily on debt and they use debit cards instead of credit cards,” he said.

At the same time, they are more into “experiences than possessions.” “They are willing to pay for experiences. I think if retail and restaurants can help create an experience for them, that will resonate with them.”

What is trending in Denver Area Rents?

The median effective rent at one-bedroom units at 17 large apartment buildings polled by BusinessDen – from Cherry Creek and Golden Triangle up to Highlands, Union Station and RiNo – rose 4.7 percent in December 2016 compared to the same month in 2015, from $1,432 to $1,500. (Effective rent subtracts specials, such as a month of free rent, from the advertised rent and is the most accurate representation of how much renters pay each month.)

Twelve of 17 apartment complexes raised rent in 2016. The Platform at Union Station raised rent the most, charging new renters $1,770 per month, up nearly 16 percent from a 2015 BusinessDen poll.

Part of the reason for the rise around town: many landlords reeled in specials last year that gave new tenants a break on the first month or more of rent.

Put another way: renters at Westend, a building in LoDo which had the median effective rent in our poll this year, will pay $67 more per month for a 2016 to 2017 lease than they would have if they had signed last December, when Westend was touting two months free for new tenants.

BusinessDen surveyed 23 large apartment buildings, 17 of them in 2015 and 2016, totaling about 6,300 units. Many apartments in the survey are part of the residential building boom sweeping the city over the past three years, as newcomers keep coming and developers keep building to house them.

The U.S. Census shows that Denver’s population increased by 11.6 percent, almost 80,000 people, in the five years ended July 2015. Last year, Denver’s population growth was high even by national standards: Census data shows Denver outpacing the 49 other most populous U.S. cities.

Meanwhile, by BusinessDen’s tally, at least 4,600 units hit the Denver rental market in 2015 and 2016, a drop in the bucket considering the U.S. Census counted 140,000 rentals in Denver in 2015.

While the median rent went up in 2016, some landlords are pitching real deals; five of the 17 buildings polled twice, in 2015 and 2016, decreased effective rent.

In Golden Triangle, for example, The Acoma used to be the only high-end apartment tower. In 2015 it rented one bedrooms at $1,945 a month and laughed at any prospects asking about a discount. Now it competes with the new 1000 Speer, called The Joule before it sold for a record price per unit.

Both towers have caved into doling out specials. The Acoma is offering a free month of rent, causing effective rent to drop 11 percent to $1,725 per month. At 1000 Speer, which claims it is 70 percent leased, the deal on the table for renters this December is far better than last year: one and a half months free, plus a $150 break on fees and three months of free parking.

Effective rent comes out to $1,562 a month, even leaving the parking perk out of the equation. Compared to a new renter at 1000 Speer last year, a new renter today would save $450 in 2016.

The only other building to drop effective rent by more than 5 percent was 2785 Speer, a gargantuan complex with 332 units that towers over Speer Boulevard at the edge of the Highlands. That building dropped effective rent 9.5 percent in 2016.

On the horizon in 2017

The Joule was sold in June for $120 million.

The march of new construction goes on in central Denver. At least 5,000 more units in Denver are set to start leasing in the next two years, by a BusinessDen tally.

Those new units pose competition for established properties, says Jonathon Papsin, a real estate broker at Colorado & Company who specializes in residential leases at high-end properties downtown and in Cherry Creek.

Papsin points to One City Block, for example, which is now facing increased competition from new builds like SkyHouse Denver and Alexan Uptown. Even so, according to BusinessDen’s survey, One City Block’s effective rent rose even more than its list price indicates.

“I struggle with understanding where rents are headed right now,” Papsin said. “But base rents will have to come down, just because Denver wages haven’t kept up with rental raises.

“Even with two months of free rent, you still have to qualify financially at the end of the day.”

About the author: Amy DiPierro View all posts by Amy DiPierro

Amy DiPierro is a BusinessDen reporter who covers residential real estate, nonprofits, startups and more. She is a graduate of Swarthmore College. Email her at amy@businessden.com